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Om AWIGHNAMASTU NAMOSIDDHAM, Terlebih dahulu, kami haturkan pangaksama mohon maaf sebesar - besarnya ke hadapan Ida Hyang Parama Kawi - Tuhan Yang Maha Esa serta Batara - Batari junjungan dan leluhur semuanya. Agar supaya, tatkala menceriterakan keberadaan para leluhur yang telah pulang ke Nirwana, kami terlepas dari kutuk dan neraka.

 
Pura Lempuyang
Pura Lempuyang (Lempuyang temple) is located on Lempuyang Mountain, Karangasem Regency, east Bali. The Balinese Hindu’s named it Sad Khayangan Agung Lempuyang Luhur, which is the place for Hyang Iswara and Hyang Agni Jaya. Puja Wali/ piodalan (sacred day) is held every six months, exactly on Umanis Galungan, Kamis (Thursday) wuku Dungulan, or the day after the Galungan ceremony. To go to Lempuyang temple from Denpasar, it is about 80 km, a 2 hour journey to the east. Along the way, you will see beautiful scenery, rice field panoramas and rivers. Lempuyang Temple contains a lot of mysteries from a long time ago, when Sang Hyang Pasupati recommended Hyang Gni Jaya together with Hyang Putra Jaya and Dewi Danuh to save Bali from disaster. Later, according to the villagers, as well as for praying, there are also people who come to Lempuyang Temple for other purposes, such as to recover from illnesses, avoid evil, and there are even politicians or officials who pray that their authority will be forever or to try to obtain a certain position. Usually they come in the middle of night, in order to avoid the public.
Balinese Temples
JBali is sometimes called the "Island of 10.000 Temples" (or "Island of the Gods") and this is not exaggerated. First of all, every village has at least three temples: the Pura Desa, where religious festivals are celebrated, the Pura Dalem for the Goddess of Death (this is the place where the funeral cremation rites start), and the Pura Puseh that is dedicated to the Gods of Heaven. Temples are everywhere, on the mountains and in the valleys, in the ricefields (they are small shrines for the Rice Goddess), and on the seaside, and every temple is different. The Balinese religion is still very much alive. Every morning you can somewhere in Bali see small or larger groups of girls and women bringing offerings to a temple and the important festivals are celebrated by everybody with large processions to the temple that are accompanied by gamelan musicians. The Balinese religion is based on Hinduism, but incorporates a lot of pre-Hindu, animist beliefs (primarily ancestor worship). In ancient times the founder of a village was revered as a god after his death by the village people. When the Hindu princes from Java occupied Bali (see ">Short Overview of the History of Bali) their form of worshipping their dead kings as gods came very close to the old Balinese ancestor worship. The many different gods of Bali (gods of Earth, Fire, Water, and Fertility) were now all viewed as different manifestations of the Trimurti, the Hindu trinity of Brahma, Vishnu, and the destroyer/creator Shiva.
Mantram
Sacred keys and magic words to God. Many common Mantram are used in the original Sanskrit language. However it is of utmost importance to truly know and be fully aware of a Mantram's true spiritual meaning. To benefit from its true and Divine Power of freeing and healing you should know the true meaning and you should fully agree with its meaning and identify yourself with its meaning and Divine power. For that particular reason we prefer to use Mantram in your own language or a language you truly understand. The Divine power of any Mantram is completely free of the language the Mantram is used in. It is your intent - your inner attitude that frees the Divine magic power contained in every Mantram. Words are magic. Use words consciously and concentrated. Be aware of what you say and use your words - and thoughts - always with Love for the greatest spiritual result and benefit. Anything else - any other attitude - may give any different result - may be even detrimental to your spiritual goals and detrimental to your souls well-being !!! Be wise in the use of Mantram - choose the path of Love and Mantram of Love only and do it with all the power of your soul and heart to result in ONENESS in God. What ever you do with all the Divine power of your soul and heart is always enough to lead you to the final destination of ONENESS in God in Love. If at any time you put all at stake that you have, all your possession, all your power, all your Love, all you ever have created, collected, earned, including ALL your memories and turn it ALL to God with Love - in Love - then it ALWAYS is sufficient to open and pass through the door of Love to God.
Ongkara
Ongkara, or the Balinese Om, is one of the most sacred symbols in the Balinese culture, symbolising the universe and life itself.When Au Kara meets Ulu Candra, the romanization is not “Aung”, but “Om”. And the letter has a special name Ongkara This word is used almost everywhere in the text, as it is the symbol of God Himself. The most notable sentences using OM are the greetings: Om Swastiastu (May God blesses you), Om Şanti Şanti Şanti, Om (May peace be everywhere)
Gayatri Mantram
om bhur bwah swah tat sawitur warenyam bhargo dewasya dhimahi dyo yonah pracodayat
Samsara
Kamis, 10 Juli 2008
Samsara or saṃsāra (Sanskrit: संसार; Tibetan: khor wa; Mongolian: orchilong) refers to the cycle of reincarnation or rebirth in Hinduism, Buddhism, Jainism, Sikhism and other related religions.

In modern Sanskrit-derived languages, it is primarily used to mean "world" in the theological sense. In other words it signifies life on earth as a place of suffering and exile from one's true origins.

According to these religions, one's karmic 'account balance' at the time of death is inherited via the state at which a person is reborn. During the course of each worldly life actions committed (for good or ill) determine the future destiny of each being in the process of becoming (evolution or devolution). At death the underlying volitional impulses (samskaras) thus accrued and developed are carried and transmitted in a consciousness structure popularly known as the soul which, after an intermediate period (in Tibetan called the bardo) forms the basis for a new biological structure that will result in rebirth and a new life. This process is considered to go on indefinitely until insight leads a person to practice renunciation of worldly pursuits and practices instead the virtues.

If one lives in evil ways, one is reborn as an animal or other unfortunate being.[1]

Contents

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Etymology

Samsara is derived from "to flow together," to go or pass through states, to wander. Mostly a great revolving door between life and death and an endless cycle of reincarnation. Also known as a game in ancient India.[citation needed]

Cycle of rebirth

Under this concept one continues to be born and reborn in various realms in the form of human, god, animal, or other being (depending on karma).[1]

Samsāra in Hinduism

In Hinduism, it is avidya, or ignorance, of one's true self, that leads to ego-consciousness of the body and the phenomenal world. This grounds one in kāma (desire) and the perpetual chain of karma and reincarnation. Through egoism and desire one creates the causes for future becoming. The state of illusion that gives rise to this is known as Maya.

Through ascetic practise one finally attains sanctity and liberation (moksha or mukti) - the equivalent of salvation in the Indian religions.

Broadly speaking, the holy life (brahmacarya) which leads to liberation is a path of self-purification by which the effects of sins are released.

The Hindu Yoga traditions hold various beliefs. Moksha may be achieved by love of Ishwar/God (see bhakti movement), by psycho-physical meditation (Raja Yoga), by discrimination of what is real and unreal through intense contemplation (Jnana Yoga) and through Karma Yoga, the path of selfless action that subverts the ego and enforces understanding of the unity of all. Advaita Vedanta, which heavily influenced Hindu Yoga, believes that Brahman, the ultimate Truth-Consciousness-Bliss, is the infinite, impersonal reality (as contrasted to the Buddhist concept of shunyata) and that through realization of it, all temporal states like deities, the cosmos and samsara itself are revealed to be nothing but manifestations of Brahman.[citation needed]

Saṃsāra in Jainism

Main article: Samsara (Jainism)
Further information: Karma in Jainism

In Jainism, Saṃsāra is the worldly life characterized by continuous rebirths and reincarnations in various realms of existence. Saṃsāra is described as mundane existence, full of suffering and misery and hence is considered undesirable and worth renunciation. The Saṃsāra is without any beginning and the soul finds itself in bondage with its karma since the beginingless time. Moksa is the only liberation from saṃsāra.

Saṃsāra in Buddhism

Main article: Samsara (Buddhism)

The concept of Samsara cyclic existence is taught by many Buddhist teachers. To understand the concept of Samsara it is important to know about the six realms, what cyclic existence is, and enlightenment or the liberation from the uncontrolled cycle of existence.

Saṃsāra in Sikhism

In Sikhism, it is thought that due to the commendable past actions and deeds (known as karma or kirat) that people obtain the chance of human birth, which is regarded in Sikhism as the highest possible on Earth and therefore an opportunity that should not be wasted. And only by continued good actions and the "Grace of the Almighty" can one obtain liberation from the continuous cycle of births and deaths of various bodily forms that the soul has been undergoing since the creation of the universe. The end of the cycle of transmigration of the soul is known as mukti. For Sikhs, the state of mukti can be achieved whilst still alive, known as "Jivan Mukat", literally "liberated whilst alive".

Saṃsāra in Surat Shabda Yoga

In Surat Shabda Yoga, attaining self-realization results in jivan moksha/mukti, liberation/release from samsara, the cycle of karma and reincarnation while in the physical body.[citation needed]

Surat Shabda Yoga cosmology presents the constitution of the initiate (the microcosm) as an exact replica of the macrocosm. Consequently, the microcosm consists of a number of bodies, each one suited to interact with its corresponding plane or region in the macrocosm. These bodies developed over the yugas through involution (emanating from higher planes to lower planes) and evolution (returning from lower planes to higher planes), including by karma and reincarnation in various states of consciousness.[citation needed]

See also

References

  1. ^ a b "Reaching the Level of the Gods", Hinduism, The Canadian Encyclopedia.

External links

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